BLACK PEOPLE DON'T EAT SUSHI

AKILAH NORTHERN (United States)

“Black people don’t eat sushi.” He said it while I was in the middle of filling a bowl with grits . .

DANGER OF CATEGORIZATION

ENOK CHOE (United States)

In November 2018, the horrific picture of a migrant mother and her daughters fleeing . . .

CLOTHES DONATION?

JUNFANG ZHANG (Singapore)

Perpetually sitting in a corner of my room is a large carrier bag filled with cast-off clothes.

THE FOOD THAT BINDS US

ROSALEEN SWEITI (United States)

There's a sort of spell that falls over the dinner table as we wait for the athan to sound.

THE FISHER QUEEN

DANIEL SHARPE (Northern Ireland)

Sweet Erin you lay far from me, 

In soils toiled by blight and blood.

BECAUSE YOU'RE WORTH IT

KIANA JACKSON (Australia)

You're deplorable, horrible, despicable, ignorable. You reiterate, evaluate, desiccate . . .

Write the World Review - Wood and Water.

WOOD AND WATER

ENLING LIAO (Australia)

Late afternoon. I never knew a whisper, soft and sweet, could sing

CHILDHOOD

GRACE LOVE (Australia)

We walked along the small terrace of grass, the blinding heat of the sun forgotten . . .

YOUR MUSICIAN

ANAIRA NOCAED (United States)

Guitar, I'm sorry. You deserve so much more. Your cracked case, covered in a few . . .

A BRIEF HISTORY VIA EGG

MELISSA XU (United States)

I grew up eating an excessive amount of eggs. Actually, that’s a little misleading.

Write the World Review - A Village Summe

A VILLAGE SUMMER

BAYA LAIMECHE (United States)

She spoke with her hands, weaving stories out of air and breathing life into them . . .

TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE

WILLIAM DASHE (United States)

Suburban living is a great, untested experiment. While this style of living . . .

JOURNALISM (Opinion)

JOURNALISM (Opinion)

Teenagers—Write the World members—write to explore and discover, to question and probe their many identities: identity of the self, the family, the community, the nation, and even the world. If the writers in this issue of Write the World Review are any indication, today’s young people are deeply thoughtful about questions of identity. They pose the broad queries of “Will my homeland ever be independent?” “Is our future urban or suburban?” “How do stereotypes limit my community?” to the personal musing of, “Am I a musician?” 

 

Whether backed by research, observation, or soul searching, they aren’t afraid to admit that their complex questions don’t have clear answers. For these contributors, the act of writing about these topics provides a constructive path toward uncovering the answers. 

 

Across the globe, young writers are asking the tough questions about who they are and using the best tool—writing—to explore possible answers. I invite you to read this issue to explore and journey along with them.

- David Weinstein, Founder, Write the World LLC

© 2020 Write the World LLC, All Rights Reserved.

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