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teacups in Britain

ELOISE DAVIS (United Kingdom)

Never before have I seen a diet so extraordinary as that of the Snamuh.

green field in Ireland

ANYA WILSON (Ireland)

When I arrive home, there are men outside our cottage. But these are not my dada's friends.

silhouette with arms outstretched in nature

AKSHITHA UPADYAYULA (India)

My words can be a sense of comfort, a feeling of being understood, a thought, an awakening.

train platform in sunlight

LOIS BELOVED (Australia)

At first they stand, orphaned, like a line of birds,

first on one foot, then the other, in unison

birds flying against sunset

YASMINE BOLDEN (United States)

You have never known those shores or those people or those words that sound like a memory

black hand holding flower branch

CARISSA CEASOR (United States)

Shirk your sense of responsibility.

Leave your guilt at the door of progress.

bicycle in Chinatown

VIVIAN ZHI (Canada)

But if I visit Chinatown and look hard enough,

I can see the traces of our history left behind.

numbers printing press

NAZEEFA AHMED (Canada)

Mathematics: prove me

with your trig identities

hand holding lemon

TAZ HANCOCK (Hong Kong)

I believe in justice,

in our voices, in theirs.

shadow on dinner table

ANNIE KIRKPATRICK (United States)

Rice piled on my plate like a cold white ant bed. Mom adjusted her glasses again.

seagull flying

PIPPI JEAN (New Zealand)

Of all the swimmer summer and the dust, sun, rain, you are what sticks out.

Milwaukee skyline

ADDISON RAHMLOW (United States)

I wasn't alive in '93, when cryptosporidium poured through the water like liquid lava

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“What kind of world do we want to build after the pandemic?” This question has been at the root of so much of our discourse in 2020, evident in both the swell of global and national movements and the steady rhythm of family conversations and individual contemplations. 

 

This question also informs the poems, stories, and essays featured in this issue of Write the World Review, which reflect diverse and hopeful visions for a better tomorrow. These writings see a world of justice and equity, where every person is embraced in all their complicated and sometimes contradictory identities; where small acts of kindness and heroism receive the recognition they deserve; where long-held national traditions are interrogated, both critically and lovingly; and where individuals are free to practice their civil rights.  


It’s an optimistic worldview that inspires hope as we turn the page on 2020 and look with anticipation to 2021. The writings in this issue give me confidence that this generation of teenagers have the uplifting perspective to influence broad positive change through the power of their words. As Akshitha Upadyayula (India) writes: 

 

My words can provide a sense of comfort, a feeling of being understood, a thought, an awakening, an escape, a reason to fight back. 

 

I know this because these are what other’s words have been to me. 

 

And it is my unwavering hope, that with the unjust, unforgivable and unacceptable acts that happen, my words will find their way to someone.

- David Weinstein, Founder, Write the World LLC