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Spirals

by Sasindie Subasinghe (Sri Lanka)

November 2021

Write the World Review

Audio: "Spirals," read by Sasindie Subasinghe

It began at the beginning in the middle of things;
at the center of the galaxy, in the middle
of a lollipop, at a mall parking lot: a spiral,
going up, coming down, round and round
around a silent axis, standing statue still,
where the world condensed before bursting out.

From a dot so minute, it grew out,
left bigger things for much smaller things,
curved the color of your eyes into helical strands; still
unsatisfied, searching for a nucleus, another middle,
another core, another axis, to wind ’round,
promise another straight line and draw another spiral.

It wrote itself in poems and stories in spiral
-bound notebooks of kisses and dreams and out
-of-place feelings and untamed curls tangled round
faces; growing up and not knowing things,
and bowls of spiral pasta in the middle
of the night when the city lights are still.

It bloomed flowers with divine proportion, still
nights giving way to rosy buds, blossoming golden-spiral
petals soft under the sun, whirling out from the middle;
then it dived into oceans and waters, mapping out
the path how the water drained the sink, left things
in hurricanes and whirlpools, spinning round and round.

It danced into sunsets, twirling in pirouettes round
the corner, where the snails with their curled shells still
made their way past the tendrils holding onto things;
and it frightened a million millipedes into a fearful spiral,
ran down the Loretto's twisting stairs and made out
with the yellow sunflowers, drawing circles in their middle.

It ate coffee swirls and swiss rolls for tea in the middle
of January, when the weather outside brought round
after round of harsh and bitter winds that left out
triangles for circles, left beelines for detours, still
swirling the brushstrokes of The Starry Night into spiral
clouds; even now, coiling another hundred things.

At last, it went out, with an artist, got lost in the middle
of life, felt things so roundly till the world spun ’round
a still thought and died in a poem, set in a spiral.




Sasindie Subasinghe is a 17-year-old writer from Colombo, Sri Lanka. She likes long car rides, sipping tea on rainy evenings, and gazing into the night sky. You can find her writing infused with lightning, stars, the sciences, and a quiet resolve to understand the ways of life.

#Nature       #Sestina

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Tom Lofft

9/24/22, 2:13 PM

Was this inspired by flights over Iceland?

Sydney

9/24/22, 10:04 AM

Amazing. I love it.

Allison

9/23/22, 7:34 AM

This is just so good!!!! "The air has been poisoned' I love how you describe things! Congrats :))

Allison

9/23/22, 7:32 AM

Love the message! The way you prompt the readers to rethink over 'is anything free' is so effective and the ending is...gorgeous.

Allison

9/23/22, 7:30 AM

Gosh, Antara...this is really beautiful! I love your use of language, and the anecdotes were so effective!! Congrats so much :))

Nidhi Kamalapurkar

9/22/22, 9:30 PM

I love it! Especially the part where you say if humans can control the world, they can control themselves too!
Keep up the brilliant writing!

Evelyn

9/22/22, 5:22 PM

Poignant and so beautifully written!

Evelyn

9/22/22, 5:19 PM

I love the flow, this is gorgeously written! Great piece!

Evelyn

9/22/22, 5:17 PM

Life really is all about the little things and you wrote about them in a beautiful way!

Evelyn

9/22/22, 5:16 PM

This is a lovely piece, Keren-Happuch! It provokes such a magical and dreamy feeling.

VM

9/19/22, 5:47 PM

Oh my god, the part about changing the mindset given the pre-existing beliefs drilled in by those around us... Even we often hesitate to have these conversations at times amongst friends as this topic is seldom more than a subject of twss jokes. You put it into words brilliantly!

Avisha M

9/17/22, 6:46 PM

this was thought-provoking! I particularly enjoyed how you connected existentialism to the topic. it provides a different perspective.